Jason Lucas Deep Stuff No. 2 - New Angling Techniques April 1945 Sports Afield.

Last week we posted the first of six articles penned by Jason Lucas in Sports Afield from March 1945 to August 1945.  Today in Lucas The Series 2, we get on to the second of those articles.

In part one, we gave a brief introduction of Jason Lucas and how important he is to contemporary bass fishing.  His article, From the Waters of Minnetonka, was a story of why bass anglers at the time couldn’t, or better yet wouldn’t, catch fish from heavily-pressured lakes near large cities.

It all boiled down to anglers not changing their tactics.  A lesson that still needs to be learned today.

Today we’re looking at Lucas’ theory of deep water fishing.  It’s not the first article on fishing in deep water but it most likely is the best for its time.

In Deep Stuff, Lucas again uses a personal experience he had with a local.  This time, though, it was an ornery local guide on the lake he’d chosen to fish.  Unlike last time, though, Lucas didn’t give him any pointers.  In fact, he steered him wrong.

By the mid-1940s, Lucas would be a major proponent of fishing deep.  Not just in the summer but in what we’d call late winter and prespawn.  He made do with the lures he had at the time; in this case it was a spoon.  But he didn’t fish the spoon in the manner we do today.

In this article, you’ll see that bass fishing trickery, hole jumping, and crowding a spot are not new to the sport.  You’ll also see that you didn’t need a GPS to take you to an offshore spot if you knew how to triangulate.  Also, in this case, Spot Lock was utilized with an anchor.

One other thing I need to acquaint you with before you read the article is free-spool casting reels of the time were not plentiful.  Most reels of the day were direct drive where the gears were always in gear and the reel handle spun backwards during the cast.

Lucas had one of the few models that was a free-spool reel.  But, unlike the reels of today, when you cranked the handle, it did not put the reel back in gear.  That was done either by flipping a switch or pushing the handle assembly into the gearbox.  Therefore, when Lucas says, “When my lure struck (the water), I’d begin to turn the reel handle – but I wouldn’t have thrown the lever to put the gears in mesh.  So, while I seemed to be reeling in, in reality the spool was revolving the other way.”

In other words, the lure was sinking but old “Nate” didn’t know that.

When Lucas talks of using the spoon, he most likely is talking about an Eppinger Dardevle.  This spoon was also known as a wobbler.  He’d let the spoon fall to the bottom, but he was aloof as to the exact retrieve he used.  I guess he didn’t want to divulge exactly what he was doing to the masses.

Instead of placing the pages in a gallery, I have posted them inline below due to the size of the print.

I hope you enjoy reading this piece of bass fishing history.  Next week we’ll be bringing you part three, Light Line and Lunkers.  I think you’ll be surprised what Lucas talks about as light line.

Jason Lucas Deep Stuff No. 2 - New Angling Techniques April 1945 Sports Afield Page 20.
Jason Lucas Deep Stuff No. 2 - New Angling Techniques April 1945 Sports Afield Page 21.
Jason Lucas Deep Stuff No. 2 - New Angling Techniques April 1945 Sports Afield Page 77.
Jason Lucas Deep Stuff No. 2 - New Angling Techniques April 1945 Sports Afield Page 78.